Golfers ready to light up long-awaited Arm End course, south of Hobart Sep24

Golfers ready to light up long-awaited Arm End course, south of Hobart...

THE SUNDAY TASMANIAN SEPTEMBER 22, 2013 source: http://www.themercury.com.au/news/tasmania/golfers-ready-to-light-up-long-awaited-arm-end-course-south-of-hobart/story-fnj4f7k1-1226724495059   THE long-anticipated Arm End golf course project south of Hobart has moved a step closer to reality, with firebreaks mown into the Opossum Bay site in anticipation of a Parks and Wildlife-managed burnoff later this week. Proponent Greg Ramsay, the Bothwell-based tourism entrepreneur responsible for the acclaimed Barnbougle Dunes course at Bridport, said he hoped the controlled vegetation backburn would reveal more about the environmental, heritage and Aboriginal values of the planned multi-use site. “Before we enter into the full lease and undertake construction, we are doing some final site studies,” Mr Ramsay said. “Our consultant initially recommended we do test-pitting for further heritage, but it was the Aboriginal committee who actually suggested a burnoff.” Mr Ramsay said the backburn, which will also offer clues as to future revegetation, pest-eradication and weed-management strategies at the site, would proceed as soon as the right weather conditions presented. Clearing out the introduced grasses, African boxthorn and heavy weeds would help designers plot exactly where the development’s golf holes, cycling tracks and walking trails would be situated. “A burnoff is a great solution as it will highlight major infestations of woody-weeds that aren’t yet visible above the grassline and we hope it reveals networks of rabbit burrows that cannot be seen below the grass,” Mr Ramsay said. “Most importantly, the burn will be reducing fuel load as the community have been concerned for many years about the fire hazard that the mass of dry grass presents in the summer.” Fellow investor Craig Ferguson said he signed up to the project, which will eventually include a Salamanca-Opossum Bay ferry link, when he saw the potential opportunity in developing a vibrant and viable recreation business. Having worked around the world, Mr Ferguson...

New Zealand wants clean sweep in Whisky Test Match series Nov28

New Zealand wants clean sweep in Whisky Test Match series...

Mon 26 Nov 2012 source: http://www.whiskymag.com/news/18188.html New Zealand wants clean sweep in Whisky Test Match series New Zealand will be hoping for a clean sweep over the UK in an Autumn International Test Match series with a difference that concludes in London on Monday. Fresh from stunning triumphs over Scotland and Wales, the New Zealand Whisky Company is taking on St George’s distillery in the final of three Whisky Test Matches. The series coincides with the All Blacks tour of Europe. While New Zealand is famed for its rugby side, it has been far less known for its whisky – until now. “Made from some of the purest ingredients on earth, the New Zealand Whisky Company has been picking up awards wherever it goes,” said company spokesman Grey Ramsay. “It is showing some of the world’s most refined whisky palates that there is so much more to a fine dram than what comes out of traditional strongholds like Scotland and Canada.” The New Zealand Whisky Company’s whiskies are also extremely rare, as they come from a distillery that is no longer in production – when it closed in 1997, it was the last distillery left in the country. The remaining stock was set aside to mature and sweeten in a South Island seaside village. It is now being released around the world, to such huge acclaim that plans are afoot to start production again. The inaugural Autumn International Whisky Test Match earlier this month pitted New Zealand’s Dunedin Doublewood, South Island Single Malt and 1990 Cask Strength against some of Scotland’s most famous brands – Johnny Walker Black, Glenfiddich Single Malt and Ardbeg Uigeadaul. It was a stunning upset as New Zealand emerged the victor with two wins and a tie. Then last week, New...

Orford project rekindled Nov14

Orford project rekindled...

Source: The Mercury, November 13, 2012 A $130 MILLION East Coast development which has been in limbo for almost a decade is set to be “resuscitated”. Glamorgan Spring Bay mayor Bertrand Cadart said proponents were preparing to give the stalled project “mouth to mouth”. The Solis development at Louisville Point near Orford was announced by Victoria’s Bayport Group in 2003. The development site covers 272ha, with approval for 620 residential lots, a golf course, a health spa and visitor cabins. Developer Mario Torossi yesterday would not comment. However, Cr Cadart said he had been working with the State Government and the proponents to push the development ahead. “The project is not quite resuscitated as such, but it is definitely revived,” he said. “I would describe it by saying that we are in the process of doing mouth-to-mouth resuscitation.” Despite reassurances there would soon be some movement on the project, Cr Cadart said it would be another 10 to 15 years before it was fully developed. He said it was important the project was delivered in stages so work could be carried out by local tradespeople and suppliers. “When it’s finished we should have there almost a township that will be, in [terms of] house numbers, as big as Triabunna,” Cr Cadart said. Despite having approval for the project, he said developers had to overcome a number of issues, including irrigation for the golf course and water supply for the town. Barnbougle golfing mastermind Greg Ramsay has been hired to revise the development, which was originally set to feature a Greg Norman-designed golf course. Despite reports last year that a Tasmanian real estate company had been acting as a consultant for Bayport, no blocks in the development have been sold. source:...

Rare Taste of Tassie in a Fine Bottle Sep07

Rare Taste of Tassie in a Fine Bottle...

Source: Tasmanian Country, September 7, 2012.  A celebrated piece of Tasmanian vineyard and colonial history in one of the ‘World’s most exciting new terroirs’ is on the market. East Coast Tasmanian wine-making was born at Cranbrook’s picturesque, sun-soaked Craigie Knowe property, and its sale represents a rare opportunity to acquire some of Tasmania’s most mature and celebrated vines, in an industry that is flourishing. The 13 acre property also includes a circa 1842 sandstone and bluestone homestead that has been fully restored and converted into a luxury boutique lodge. Craigie Knowe was one of several properties farmed by the pioneering Amos family, who accumulated significant holdings in the Cranbrook area. The homestead was built by James Amos (1804-1864), and it sits on the highest point of the Swan valley floor, on a craggy knoll that in Gaelic was termed Craigie Knowe. In 1979, dentist John Austwick chose Craigie Knowe for his first vine plantings because of its rich volcanic soils and the area’s long hot summer days. He wanted to produce his favourite Bordeaux-style Cabernet Sauvignons. Austwick’s sheep-farmer neighbours thought he was mad, but over the last three decades, Craigie Knowe’s wine has become highly acclaimed – recognized as Tasmania’s first great Cabernet Sauvignon but also celebrated for its Pinot Noir and Riesling. Read full...

Celebrated vineyard goes on the market Sep06

Celebrated vineyard goes on the market...

Sources: Tasmanian Times, 03.09.12 A celebrated piece of Tasmanian vineyard and colonial history in one of the ‘World’s most exciting new terroirs’ is on the market. East Coast Tasmanian wine-making was born at Cranbrook’s picturesque, sun-soaked Craigie Knowe property, and its sale represents a rare opportunity to acquire some of Tasmania’s most mature and celebrated vines, in an industry that is flourishing. The 13 acre property also includes a circa 1842 sandstone and bluestone homestead that has been fully restored and converted into a luxury boutique lodge. Craigie Knowe was one of several properties farmed by the pioneering Amos family, who accumulated significant holdings in the Cranbrook area. The homestead was built by James Amos (1804-1864), and it sits on the highest point of the Swan valley floor, on a craggy knoll that in Gaelic was termed Craigie Knowe. In 1979, dentist John Austwick chose Craigie Knowe for his first vine plantings because of its rich volcanic soils and the area’s long hot summer days. He wanted to produce his favourite Bordeaux-style Cabernet Sauvignons. Austwick’s sheep-farmer neighbours thought he was mad, but over the last three decades, Craigie Knowe’s wine has become highly acclaimed – recognized as Tasmania’s first great Cabernet Sauvignon but also celebrated for its Pinot Noir and Riesling. Read full...

Otago Whiskies Named World’s Best Sep06

Otago Whiskies Named World’s Best...

Source: Otago Daily Times, 6 Sep 2012 Two brands of whisky matured at the towering seaside bond store in Oamaru have been named as the “world’s best” at the Mid-West Whisky Olympics in Michigan. Competing against some of the best known brand-names from Scotland, Ireland and the United States, the 10-year-old Dunedin DoubleWood blended whisky and the 21-year-old South Island Single Malt whisky, both manufactured at the now defunct Willowbank distillery in Dunedin, were named the world’s best blended and single malt whisky, respectively. Read full...

Bold plan for golf course Aug22

Bold plan for golf course...

Source: The Mercury, August 18, 2012 A BOLD $85 million vision to transform the Claremont golf and bowls clubs into a sporting, tourism and residential complex is within striking distance. The board of the Claremont Golf Club has unveiled artist impressions of the proposed Claremont Peninsula Sports Complex and are confident the project will have won approval from the Glenorchy City Council and the Tasmanian Planning Commission by Christmas. A 90-room hotel complex, a restaurant and 77 stratum titled units, incorporating two and three-bedroom dwellings, are proposed for the project which could create 100 jobs once completed. READ FULL...

Full-bodied drop found in a NZ barrel Aug22

Full-bodied drop found in a NZ barrel

source: The Australian Financial Review, 16 August 2012 Good whisky weather is not like good beer weather. Whisky comes from areas where the ground is thick and muddy and the sky a dense grey blanket. Scotland, for example. Ireland, too. Tasmania even. But also New Zealand. Greg Ramsay – a man whose blood runs with the peaty smells of single malts – has revived the Tasmanian whisky industry and is now focusing on the land of the long white cloud. READ FULL...

Spirit of Anzacs key ingredient of whisky May05

Spirit of Anzacs key ingredient of whisky...

A FORMER Marrawah graphic designer has created the Anzac-inspired label for a whisky believed to be the first bottle of double malt brewed in two countries – New Zealand and Australia – and married together. The label taps into the Anzac legacy by featuring Anzacs telling stories in the French trenches during World War 1. Designer, Bec Parnell, went to Smithton High School before her career took her to the UK.   Now living in Hobart with her husband and two children, her latest work is the Diggers&Ditch Anzac Double Malt Whisky label, for which she designed the brand and packaging. Mrs Parnell said: “It’s so wonderful to be back in Tasmania … living in England was fabulous, but we were always looking forward to coming back to Australia.” Andrew Quarry, a buyer at BigBargain bottleshops started at Ulverstone and Devonport, said the whisky is thought to be the first ever trans-national double malt from whisky made in two countries. “All the others are just Irish, or Scotch, but this is aged New Zealand whisky married with Australia’s best; from Tasmania of course,” he said. Some of the funds from the whisky will be donated to maintain war memorials. READ FULLL...

In the Knowe at Cranbrook Apr19

In the Knowe at Cranbrook...

Mod cons combined with a few imaginary ghosts equals luxury accommodation as The Examiner’s travel writer, DAVID SCOTT, discovers. source: The Examiner April 16, 2012   CRAIGIE Knowe sits in old-school wine country. For one thing, many vines around this patch of the East Coast have survived in Swansea and Cranbrook backyards since the 1800s. For another, dentist John Austwick chose to cultivate vines at Craigie Knowe in the 1970s in pursuit of his dream cabernet sauvignon, in the Bordeaux style of which he was fond. [read full article]...

Craigie Knowe on 7:30 Report Mar08

Craigie Knowe on 7:30 Report...

A report on John Austwick and Craigie Knowe on ABC’s 7:30 report.

Plans firm for new golf haven Mar08

Plans firm for new golf haven...

Source: The Mercury  TASMANIAN entrepreneur Greg Ramsay hopes to begin work on a golf course, recreation and accommodation development on the South Arm peninsula by the end of next year. Mr Ramsay, the driving force behind the Barnbougle and Bicheno golf course developments, said Arm End which took its name from the headland would retain and improve access to the public. And he said a proposed River Derwent ferry service, offering a 15-minute trip to Hobart, would add to the attraction. “We’re looking forward to working further with the local residents and some of the world’s great public planners to investigate the best mix of public recreation and environmental investment,” Mr Ramsay said. The 18-hole links course, including the “ball spray” area where balls may stray outside the maintained course, would take up less than 25 per cent of the 146 hectare site, leaving room for walking trails, picnic pavilions, fishing platforms and cycle-ways.   READ FULL...

PGA: Tasmania’s bid to become golfing capital Feb29

PGA: Tasmania’s bid to become golfing capital...

Source: PGA Tasmania continues its bid to become the nation’s golfing capital with the announcement last week a new golf residential development has been approved for the East Coast town of Bicheno. The joint venture, between Bicheno Golf Club and local landowners Peter and Jana Johnstone, will feature 62 homes along with a golf course designed by Adelaide firm Crafter Mogford Golf Strategies. Local golf identity Greg Ramsay, who was involved with the early development of Barnbougle Dunes, is also involved in the project. “I spoke with the golf club over 20 years ago about doing something but have since focused on conservation and covenanting land in the area,” Peter Johnstone told The Mercury neswspaper. “When I met Greg Ramsay and saw what he’d been able to achieve with Barnbougle Dunes and knowing Bicheno was really losing its status as the East Coast’s No. 1 resort town, we got together. “The group estimates about $6 million will be invested in the local area during construction of the development. GO TO WEBSITE    ...